Technology and Innovation

Outsourcing With Care

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Challenges of international outsourcing

Many tech entrepreneurs face the question of whether to outsource software development to a foreign country. After all, there are good coders in countries like India, Russia and Argentina, while U.S. developers are quite pricey in comparison. But managing a team or project from afar can be quite challenging: communication often gets lost in translation and cultural differences; accountability is diluted across borders; pop-ins are not possible; contracts are harder to enforce; IP issues can come up; and even quality might not be as good as you expected. Here are a couple of simple (but often neglected) steps one can take to minimize risks.

Dealing with international outsourcing

First, make sure you consider firms or developers that have been referred by a client you know and trust. Don’t just pick a developer on Google or let yourself be lured by pretty emails selling outsourcing services. My LinkedIn inbox often gets messages from Indian and Russian developers offering their services. Maybe they are good, who knows, but I wouldn’t risk it. Client referrals are especially important when dealing with international suppliers in general. Ask a lot of questions to the referrer, such as how the developers deal with deadlines, if their English is good, if different time zone was an issue, how they heard about them in the first place, besides of course the quality of the job.

Second, before starting the work, have a face-to-face meeting at least once. Maybe your guy will come to the U.S. for a conference or to visit a client. Or, better yet, catch a cheap red-eye flight and go spend a couple of days with them. Meet the team, check out their office (garage?), go out for lunch, have a vodka (or whatever they drink) together. If the job is at least a five-figure commitment, visiting them is a relatively small investment and it will pay off. Despite Skype and all, in today’s world it is still important to shake hands once in a while, make things more personable. Putting a face to the partnership can help mitigate risks in the future and improve crisis management.

Don’t underestimate the complexities of outsourcing development to a foreign country. Knowing who you are dealing with, both through others and your own contact, is extremely important. An outsourcing job gone bad is hard to fix. Exit costs are high and transferring work to a new team may be difficult, if not impossible. If you don’t outsource with care, as we often say it in Brazil, “what’s supposed to be cheap becomes very expensive”.

See also An idea is Just That – Not Yet An InnovationImage: blogandretire.com

What’s your experience with software outsource? Leave us a comment!

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With Disruptive Innovation, Customer Is Not Always Right

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Disruptive innovations and customer feedback

A recent study by ChubbyBrain.com listed the top 20 reasons why startups fail. The #1 reason, ahead of funding, product quality, pricing and other popular ones, was “ignoring or not seeking customer feedback”. However, there are two sides to this.

If your company is launching a disruptive technology, or a at least a truly innovative product, and you really believe in it, taking initial customer feedback at face value may not necessarily be the best way to go. A classic example is the walkman. When Sony was building the product in the 1970s it reached out to potential customers to learn what they thought of it. The most common reaction was to say that the walkman was a stupid idea! Who would walk around listening to music, instead of enjoying it while sitting back in the couch? How would you run errands or even jog with “speakers” on your ears, not hearing what’s going on around you? Had Sony been discouraged by this feedback, it would have probably discontinued the project and missed out on this huge hit.

If not a disruptive innovation, follow the rules

Now, if your product, like the vast majority, is not starting a new market or doesn’t require change in attitude or lifestyle, then of course the story is different. You should adapt to your clients as much as possible, not expect them to do so. This sounds intuitive, but many entrepreneurs (including myself in the past) think their product is so great that the problem, really, is with the rest of the world that doesn’t want it the way it is. Distancing yourself from your “baby” and taking client feedback into consideration is fundamental, both in the product development stage and thereafter.

At the end of the day, it is a judgement call. Do you believe so much in what you are doing – and how you are doing it – that you are willing to risk ignoring customer feedback? Are you breaking a paradigm of sorts to expect to be right over the majority of people you are supposed to serve? Only a very small percentage of startups would fall in this category. If you are one of them, you will have an uphill battle to change people’s behaviors; but one that can have a huge payoff.

See also Not All Angel Investors Are From HeavenImage: pocketcalculatorshow.com

What’s your experience with disruptive technologies? Leave us a comment!

An Idea Is Just That – Not Yet An Innovation

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Innovation and new ideas

I am frequently approached by people who want to share a new business idea with me. Some are actually good, others, well, you know. Usually the pitch is accompanied by a good amount of mystery and secrecy: “Andre, I’m telling you this because I trust you, but don’t tell anyone; this could be big”. So let me summarize what I tell friends who approach me like that.

Turning an idea (hopefully) into an innovation

First, don’t worry too much about secrecy. Your new idea is likely not as much of an innovation as you think, it has probably come up before in one way or another. And even if it is (almost) that great, you will only be able to go somewhere by sharing it with other people who can give you useful feedback and leads. The chances of someone stealing your idea are probably slimmer than you turning it into a business without sharing it with others. Competent people are busy and know how time consuming and risky it is to start something new.

Second, ask yourself what YOU would bring to the table. Are you business savvy? Have the relevant technical skills? Money to invest? An amazing network in the industry? Lots of time to spare (on top of at least a bit of one of the former)? If you answered “yes” to one or more of the questions, then great, you should move forward. Try to find the people and resources needed to complement your skill-set and hit the road. But if the answers are straight “no’s”, I need to say you should probably let go and try to think of another idea.

To illustrate this, once a friend came to me with a pretty good idea for a mobile app. However, he didn’t know a thing about starting a company or building an app, didn’t have money to invest, didn’t know anyone in the industry, and was not willing to invest a good chunk of his time on it. Seriously? Don’t expect that someone will start a company with you just because you had a decent idea, especially because the idea will evolve/change as the business matures. You need to bring something concrete to the table. Ideas are just ideas… We all have tons of them.

See also Not All Angel Investors Are From HeavenImage: shutterstock.com

Have you ever had a business idea? What did you make of it? Leave us a comment!

Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Prosperity

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Entrepreneurship and economic development

What is the common ground between the economic prosperity of the Netherlands in the XVII-XVIII centuries, nineteenth century England, twentieth century U.S. and, more recently, countries such as South Korea, Singapore and Israel? Although the question could be answered from different angles, fundamentally it can be inferred: in their own time, these countries promoted economic systems where resources were efficiently channeled to the most competent entrepreneurs and endeavors.

Canadian economist Reuven Brenner summed it up perfectly: “Prosperity is the result of matching talent with capital and holding both sides accountable”. The “capital” can come from one or more sources: capital markets, government, savings or inheritance. The “talent” may be fostered internally – through education, incentives for innovation and entrepreneurship, development of a risk-taking culture – and/or imported, with the opening of borders to skilled and entrepreneurial immigrants. Finally, “accountability” is constructed through solid institutions (political, economic, regulatory, legal, social) that promote a stable business environment, where contracts are honored and a long-term perspective is installed.

Back in time, on entrepreneurship and prosperity

In the XVII-XVIII centuries, the Netherlands had the most developed capital market in the world. It operated the forefront of financial instruments, both debt and equity, which enabled people and companies with good business ideas to grow their ventures. Therefore, at a time when most societies were divided essentially into castes – with royalty, nobility and aristocracy keeping their wealth generation after generation – the Dutch popularized the access to capital and implemented a socioeconomic system that was (by the time’s standards) more democratic and meritocratic. Moreover, in addition to having effective institutions, it opened its doors to immigrants from diverse backgrounds, welcoming for example Spanish Jews and French Huguenots, who brought innovations from their countries and who, by definition, were mostly entrepreneurs (what is more enterprising than venturing oneself into a new country?)

A century later, England became the engine of the Industrial Revolution within the same logic: capital-talent-institutions. Innovations, both technological (e.g., steam engines) and of process (e.g., revolutionary management techniques) were only possible due to an economic system where risk was properly rewarded and the process of trial and error was stimulated. In the second half of the twentieth century, the United States, in turn, established itself as the major economic superpower based on: capital (Wall Street, Silicon Valley and its angel investors and VC/PE funds, R&D subsidies); talent (Americans and immigrants educated in universities such as Stanford, Harvard and MIT); and institutional climate (pro-business laws, efficient legal system, overall social fabric etc.)

Immigration was especially important in the U.S. As proof, 40% of Fortune 500 companies were founded by immigrants or their children, including giants such as Intel, Google, eBay, Apple and GE. Furthermore, ¾ of patents developed in American universities had the participation of immigrants. It is no wonder that immigration reform is constantly brought up within the debate for promoting American competitiveness and sustained economic growth.

Recently, the most successful cases of economic development were the Asian Tigers. The political, economic and institutional reforms that occurred in these countries, combined with investment in education and the development of capital markets, enabled a flurry of investments and skilled immigration, driving the growth and development of these countries. Another interesting case is Israel, a nation created just over half a century ago, in the middle of the desert, and that thrives due to skilled immigration and education, dynamic access to capital (private and public), a culture conducive to risk taking, and solid institutions.

Traditionally, the quest for prosperity has been driven by top-down policies, often based on unrealistic economic models. Looking at economies through the lenses of “capital-talent-accountability” gives us a clearer view of the issues at hand, from the bottom up. It provides better grounds for understanding the underlying factors that build an economy and allows for more factual and entrepreneurship-friendly policy making.

Andre Averbug is an entrepreneur and economist.

See also An Idea Is Just That – Not Yet An InnovationImage: source unknown (anyone?)

What’s your opinion about the link between entrepreneurship and prosperity? Leave us a comment!