Entrepreneur and the Startup

Outsourcing With Care

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Challenges of international outsourcing

Many tech entrepreneurs face the question of whether to outsource software development to a foreign country. After all, there are good coders in countries like India, Russia and Argentina, while U.S. developers are quite pricey in comparison. But managing a team or project from afar can be quite challenging: communication often gets lost in translation and cultural differences; accountability is diluted across borders; pop-ins are not possible; contracts are harder to enforce; IP issues can come up; and even quality might not be as good as you expected. Here are a couple of simple (but often neglected) steps one can take to minimize risks.

Dealing with international outsourcing

First, make sure you consider firms or developers that have been referred by a client you know and trust. Don’t just pick a developer on Google or let yourself be lured by pretty emails selling outsourcing services. My LinkedIn inbox often gets messages from Indian and Russian developers offering their services. Maybe they are good, who knows, but I wouldn’t risk it. Client referrals are especially important when dealing with international suppliers in general. Ask a lot of questions to the referrer, such as how the developers deal with deadlines, if their English is good, if different time zone was an issue, how they heard about them in the first place, besides of course the quality of the job.

Second, before starting the work, have a face-to-face meeting at least once. Maybe your guy will come to the U.S. for a conference or to visit a client. Or, better yet, catch a cheap red-eye flight and go spend a couple of days with them. Meet the team, check out their office (garage?), go out for lunch, have a vodka (or whatever they drink) together. If the job is at least a five-figure commitment, visiting them is a relatively small investment and it will pay off. Despite Skype and all, in today’s world it is still important to shake hands once in a while, make things more personable. Putting a face to the partnership can help mitigate risks in the future and improve crisis management.

Don’t underestimate the complexities of outsourcing development to a foreign country. Knowing who you are dealing with, both through others and your own contact, is extremely important. An outsourcing job gone bad is hard to fix. Exit costs are high and transferring work to a new team may be difficult, if not impossible. If you don’t outsource with care, as we often say it in Brazil, “what’s supposed to be cheap becomes very expensive”.

See also An idea is Just That – Not Yet An InnovationImage: blogandretire.com

What’s your experience with software outsource? Leave us a comment!

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With Disruptive Innovation, Customer Is Not Always Right

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Disruptive innovations and customer feedback

A recent study by ChubbyBrain.com listed the top 20 reasons why startups fail. The #1 reason, ahead of funding, product quality, pricing and other popular ones, was “ignoring or not seeking customer feedback”. However, there are two sides to this.

If your company is launching a disruptive technology, or a at least a truly innovative product, and you really believe in it, taking initial customer feedback at face value may not necessarily be the best way to go. A classic example is the walkman. When Sony was building the product in the 1970s it reached out to potential customers to learn what they thought of it. The most common reaction was to say that the walkman was a stupid idea! Who would walk around listening to music, instead of enjoying it while sitting back in the couch? How would you run errands or even jog with “speakers” on your ears, not hearing what’s going on around you? Had Sony been discouraged by this feedback, it would have probably discontinued the project and missed out on this huge hit.

If not a disruptive innovation, follow the rules

Now, if your product, like the vast majority, is not starting a new market or doesn’t require change in attitude or lifestyle, then of course the story is different. You should adapt to your clients as much as possible, not expect them to do so. This sounds intuitive, but many entrepreneurs (including myself in the past) think their product is so great that the problem, really, is with the rest of the world that doesn’t want it the way it is. Distancing yourself from your “baby” and taking client feedback into consideration is fundamental, both in the product development stage and thereafter.

At the end of the day, it is a judgement call. Do you believe so much in what you are doing – and how you are doing it – that you are willing to risk ignoring customer feedback? Are you breaking a paradigm of sorts to expect to be right over the majority of people you are supposed to serve? Only a very small percentage of startups would fall in this category. If you are one of them, you will have an uphill battle to change people’s behaviors; but one that can have a huge payoff.

See also Not All Angel Investors Are From HeavenImage: pocketcalculatorshow.com

What’s your experience with disruptive technologies? Leave us a comment!

An Idea Is Just That – Not Yet An Innovation

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Innovation and new ideas

I am frequently approached by people who want to share a new business idea with me. Some are actually good, others, well, you know. Usually the pitch is accompanied by a good amount of mystery and secrecy: “Andre, I’m telling you this because I trust you, but don’t tell anyone; this could be big”. So let me summarize what I tell friends who approach me like that.

Turning an idea (hopefully) into an innovation

First, don’t worry too much about secrecy. Your new idea is likely not as much of an innovation as you think, it has probably come up before in one way or another. And even if it is (almost) that great, you will only be able to go somewhere by sharing it with other people who can give you useful feedback and leads. The chances of someone stealing your idea are probably slimmer than you turning it into a business without sharing it with others. Competent people are busy and know how time consuming and risky it is to start something new.

Second, ask yourself what YOU would bring to the table. Are you business savvy? Have the relevant technical skills? Money to invest? An amazing network in the industry? Lots of time to spare (on top of at least a bit of one of the former)? If you answered “yes” to one or more of the questions, then great, you should move forward. Try to find the people and resources needed to complement your skill-set and hit the road. But if the answers are straight “no’s”, I need to say you should probably let go and try to think of another idea.

To illustrate this, once a friend came to me with a pretty good idea for a mobile app. However, he didn’t know a thing about starting a company or building an app, didn’t have money to invest, didn’t know anyone in the industry, and was not willing to invest a good chunk of his time on it. Seriously? Don’t expect that someone will start a company with you just because you had a decent idea, especially because the idea will evolve/change as the business matures. You need to bring something concrete to the table. Ideas are just ideas… We all have tons of them.

See also Not All Angel Investors Are From HeavenImage: shutterstock.com

Have you ever had a business idea? What did you make of it? Leave us a comment!

MBA For Entrepreneurs Can Still Matter

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MBA and entrepreneurs

At times it seems MBA programs are passed their glory days. Every so often we see articles saying that they can be a waste of time and money, especially if your goal is to become an entrepreneur. My two cents: if you have no business background and you can afford it, a good MBA is still a great thing! My background is in economics and I wouldn’t have started my first company without the skills and confidence I acquired in business school.

MBA for entrepreneurs

If your undergrad is in the sciences or the arts and you want to start your own company, an MBA can be a good idea. Some will say that all you need is a business-savvy partner; but you know what, it’s not ideal to rely solely on others. Of course you will not become a management guru overnight (you don’t want that anyways), but by going to business school you at least learn the basics, the jargon, and know where to find the answers. You can sit down in front of an investor or Board and not look like a big question mark when they start talking about P&Ls, financial ratios, or SWOT analyses.

In a good business school you also meet interesting people, from different countries and sectors, expanding your network and perspective on things. You can bounce off ideas with smart people and potentially find the partner you’re looking for. You become part of an alumni group that can be of service in the future. Hey, even some of your professors might not be as dull as you think and give you good advice and open doors for you.

Depending on your age and where you currently stand professionally and financially, it might be that a two-year full-time program doesn’t make sense anymore. The opportunity cost can be too high. But you can do a one-year program, there a great ones in Europe, Canada and a few in the US. Or do a part-time executive program. If you can afford it, it’s never a waste to learn new skills and meet good people.

See also Entrepreneurship, Innovation and ProsperityImage: linkedin.com

Are you an entrepreneur and attended business school? Leave us a comment!

In Seed Capital Fundraising, You Gotta Choose Your Pizza

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Seed capital and ownership

A common mistake entrepreneurs make, especially in the startup’s early stage, is to worry too much about valuation and dilution. The business, after all, is their “baby” and they can’t give away too much too soon – every share is worth fighting for! Well, guess what, the business is almost as much of a baby to those who are willing to back you up so early. Overvaluing the company from the get-go generates problems on several fronts.

Seed capital must be priced with care

First, very often the early investors are “3Fs” (friends, family and fools) or an angel who is only within one or two degrees of separation. Selling an overpriced product, even if you didn’t do it with bad intentions, may leave everyone with a bad taste in their mouths; especially if an institutional investor comes in a year later and values the company at half the first round. It’s hard to explain that to your uncle.

Also, overpricing makes it more difficult to raise new rounds. It sends the wrong message to more sophisticated investors. The impression is that you either don’t know how to value a company, purposely overpriced it, or the company simply lost some of its value. Neither is a good story to tell when you are sitting across the table from a VC.

Obviously, at the same time it isn’t good for anyone that the first couple of investors grab more than say 30-40% of the company. The entrepreneur needs to remain motivated, ideally also vesting some of the equity (more about that in a future post). But getting obsessed with dilution is bad for your startup. The more deep-pockets have their skin in the game the better and greater the chances the business will grow for everyone. After all, which would you prefer: 90% of a pizza or 10% of Pizza Hut?

See also Not All Angel Investors Are From HeavenImage: generalstorecafenj.com

Have you raised seed capital with 3Fs or angel investors? Leave us a comment!

Time to Start a Business – or Not

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What to ask yourself before starting a company

Before launching a startup, an entrepreneur must ask him or herself the following question: Can I support myself for the next 18-24 months? This is specially important if you’re in your late twenties or early thirties.

It doesn’t matter where support comes from. It could be your parents, your own savings, your partner’s job, or a liquid asset you’re willing to sell at some point. It could even come from your first investor, such as an angel, although very rarely outside investors are willing to pay you a (decent) salary, especially in the early days of a startup. The important thing to remember is that it will take longer than you think before your company is making money to pay you, or an institutional investor joins in with a paycheck.

Don’t expect short-term returns when starting a company

Drawn into the excitement of launching their ventures, entrepreneurs usually underestimate the sacrifices to come. Optimists by nature, they assume that something great is going to happen within a year: a successful pilot or beta launch, an investor, even a first client. Not gonna happen. Success stories about entrepreneurs who dropped out of college or left a job to support themselves on credit card debts are very sexy but incredibly rare. They do however get all the media attention. You won’t read a piece on TechCrunch about the entrepreneur who ran out of steam, shut down his company, broke up with his girlfriend in the process, and had to go back to his parents house.

The concept of time is very different for bootstrapping entrepreneurs and… well, the rest of the world! While you’re bleeding and resources are drying up, potential investors and clients will tell you comfortably: “Come back in six months or when you have more clients”. It’s a brutal catch-22 and it will drive you crazy unless you can’t support yourself and get into real world’s time.

If you’re in the early twenties or otherwise can afford it, screw it, take all risks! Starting a company – successfully or not – will be a great school anyways. If that’s not you, by all means, do also go ahead and pursue your dreams. But make sure you first do some planning on the personal front, soldier.

See also MBA For Entrepreneurs Can Still MatterImage: fotolia.com

Have you ever launched a new venture? How did you support yourself? leave us a comment!